Colombia after 50 years of conflict: Documentary

Colombia’s civil war has lasted more than 50 years. A revised peace agreement was signed by Farc rebels and the government in November 2016.

But healing the wounds left behind by the war will take time. A new peace deal including some revisions to penalties that may be imposed on FARC rebels has been approved by legislators. It is hoped that it will finally help bring peace and reconciliation to the traumatized country. What the future holds for Colombia after 52 years of civil war is uncertain. Even with a new accord, the peace process remains fragile. One sign of hope is the award of the 2016 Nobel Peace Prize to Colombian President Juan Manuel Santos – an expression of support for the process of peaceful dialogue. After October’s failed referendum, rebel leaders of the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia (FARC) remained in negotiations with the government. On 24 November 2016, the FARC and the government signed the revised accord and legislators approved it days later. But for many critics, the sharper penalties to be imposed on the rebels still don’t go far enough. Ordinary Colombians continue to suffer the effects of decades of war. More than six million people were internally displaced and even today many are unable to return to their homes. Time and time again civilians found themselves caught up in the fighting between guerrillas and the Colombian armed forces. Torture was commonplace. FARC guerillas, security forces and, above all, paramilitary groups perpetrated many massacres. More than 220,000 people were killed, mostly civilians, and at least 35,000 persons are still missing. Coming to terms with this brutal war promises to be a lengthy and painful process. This report gives a voice to the victims of war and to the relatives of those killed or still missing after years of conflict.

Colombia after 50 years of conflict: Documentary

©DW Documentary

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